Learning English with Robinson Crusoe

I recently read A Concise Chinese-English Dictionary for Lovers by Xiaolu Guo which aside from being a great read will also be of extra interest to language teachers because it captures the progress of a language learner in English. Reading it also reminded me of an article I wrote many years ago for English Teaching Professional (Issue 15) all the way back in 2000(!) It was about the portrayal of one-to-one teaching in the book Robinson Crusoe and what we could learn from it. Here’s the article reprinted below. Feel free to comment if you have other examples of ELT lessons described in literature. Lessons for…

Eye on the classroom 5: Post-observation feedback

This is the fifth and final post in a series that originally appear in English Teaching Professional and is reposted here with the permission of Pavilion Publishing. The previous posts in this series about classroom observation have all been about why and how we can observe the classroom. So it seems fitting that this final post looks at how feedback after the observation is approached. Watch what you say   For many observations, feedback afterwards is not necessarily planned. For example, a trainee teacher may be asked to observe a lesson and have little or no further contact with the more experienced teacher. However,…

Eye on the classroom 1: Peer Observation

Between 2008-2009 I wrote a series of six articles for English Teaching Professional on the topic of classroom observations. It was called ‘Eye on the classroom’. So with permission of English Teaching Professional and Pavilion Publishing to reprint the articles here, I’ll post all six in the next few days. Note that in places they might not appear in their full entirety as the originals came with photocopiable pro-forma. However, if you are a subscriber to English Teaching Professional you can download the original as a pdf. Eye on the classroom 1: Peer Observation Many language schools and their teachers…